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Mechanical design and control of the new 7-DOF CyberMotion simulator

MPS-Authors
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84078

Masone,  C
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84174

Robuffo Giordano,  P
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83839

Bülthoff,  HH
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Masone, C., Robuffo Giordano, P., & Bülthoff, H. (2011). Mechanical design and control of the new 7-DOF CyberMotion simulator. In IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation (ICRA 2011) (pp. 4935-4942). Piscataway, NJ, USA: IEEE.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-BBD2-1
Abstract
This paper describes the mechanical and control design of the new 7-DOF CyberMotion Simulator, a redundant industrial manipulator arm consisting of a standard 6-DOF anthropomorphic manipulator plus an actuated cabin attached to the end-effector. Contrarily to Stewart platforms, an industrial manipulator offers several advantages when used as motion simulator: larger motion envelope, higher dexterity, and possibility to realize any end-effector posture within the workspace. In addition to this, the new actuated cabin acts as an additional joint and provides the needed kinematic redundancy to cope with the robot actuator and joint range constraints, which in general can significantly deteriorate the desired motion cues the robot is reproducing. In particular, we will show that, by suitably exploiting the redundancy better results can be obtained in reproducing sustained acceleration cues, a relevant problem when implementing vehicle simulators.