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Two-photon calcium imaging of evoked activity from L5 somatosensory neurons in vivo

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http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84086

Mittmann,  W
Research Group Neural Population Imaging, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84296

Wallace,  DJ
Research Group Neural Population Imaging, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83872

Czubayko,  U
Research Group Neural Population Imaging, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84010

Kerr,  JND
Research Group Neural Population Imaging, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Mittmann, W., Wallace, D., Czubayko, U., Herb JT, Schaefer AT, Looger LL, Denk, W., & Kerr, J. (2011). Two-photon calcium imaging of evoked activity from L5 somatosensory neurons in vivo. Nature Neuroscience, 14(8), 1089-1093. doi:1038/nn.2879.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-BAC4-B
Abstract
Multiphoton imaging (MPI) is widely used for recording activity simultaneously from many neurons in superficial cortical layers in vivo. We combined regenerative amplification multiphoton microscopy (RAMM) with genetically encoded calcium indicators to extend MPI of neuronal population activity into layer 5 (L5) of adult mouse somatosensory cortex. We found that this approach could be used to record and quantify spontaneous and sensory-evoked activity in populations of L5 neuronal somata located as much as 800 μm below the pia. In addition, we found that RAMM could be used to simultaneously image activity from large (~80) populations of apical dendrites and follow these dendrites down to their somata of origin.