de.mpg.escidoc.pubman.appbase.FacesBean
Deutsch
 
Hilfe Wegweiser Impressum Kontakt Einloggen
  DetailsucheBrowse

Datensatz

DATENSATZ AKTIONENEXPORT

Freigegeben

Vortrag

Exploring motion-induced illusory displacement using interactive games

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84258

Thornton,  IM
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84073

Canaird F, Mamassian,  P
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83839

Bülthoff,  HH
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

Externe Ressourcen
Es sind keine Externen Ressourcen verfügbar
Volltexte (frei zugänglich)
Es sind keine frei zugänglichen Volltexte verfügbar
Ergänzendes Material (frei zugänglich)
Es sind keine frei zugänglichen Ergänzenden Materialien verfügbar
Zitation

Thornton, I., Canaird F, Mamassian, P., & Bülthoff, H. (2011). Exploring motion-induced illusory displacement using interactive games. Talk presented at 34th European Conference on Visual Perception. Toulouse, France.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-BAA4-4
Zusammenfassung
Motion-induced illusory displacement occurs when local motion within an object causes its perceived global position to appear shifted. Using two different paradigms, we explored whether active control of the physical position of the object can overcome this illusion. In Experiment 1, we created a simple joystick game in which participants guided a Gabor patch along a randomly curving path. In Experiment 2, participants used the accelerometer-based tilt control of the iPad to guide a Gabor patch through a series of discrete gates, as might be found on a slalom course. In both experiments, participants responded to local motion with overcompensating movements in the opposite direction, leading to systematic errors. These errors scaled with speed but did not vary in magnitude either within or across trials. In conclusion, we found no evidence that participants could adapt or compensate for illusory displacement given active control of the target.