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Welcome to Wonderland: The Apparent Size of the Body Influences Perceived Extents in Virtual Environments

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http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84060

Linkenauger,  SA
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84088

Mohler,  BJ
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83839

Bülthoff,  HH
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Linkenauger, S., Mohler, B., & Bülthoff, H. (2011). Welcome to Wonderland: The Apparent Size of the Body Influences Perceived Extents in Virtual Environments. Poster presented at 11th Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society (VSS 2011), Naples, FL, USA.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-BA9A-B
Abstract
According to the functional approach to the perception of spatial layout, angular optic variables that indicate extents are scaled to the action capabilities of the body (see Proffitt, 2006, POPS, for a review). For example, reachable extents are perceived as a proportion of the maximum extent to which one can reach, and the apparent sizes of graspable objects are perceived as a proportion of the maximum extent that one can grasp (Linkenauger et al., 2009, JEP:HPP; Linkenauger, Ramenzoni, Proffitt, 2010, Psychol Sci; Witt, Proffitt, Epstein, 2005, JEP:HPP). Therefore, apparent distances and sizes can be influenced by changing the action capabilities of the body. In order to directly manipulate the perceived action capabilities of the body, participants were immersed into a full cue virtual environment. In real time, participants' hand, arm, and head movements were mapped onto a self-avatar which the participant viewed from the first-person perspective via a head-mounted display. To manipulate perceived action capabilities, the apparent size of the participants' hand was altered by decreasing or increasing the size of the self-avatar's virtual hand (small, normal, and large). Participants estimated the sizes of various objects in the virtual environment. Participants perceived objects to be larger when their virtual hand was smaller and perceived objects to be smaller when their virtual hand was larger. Consistent with the functional approach, the differences in apparent size across the conditions increased as a function of object size, suggesting changes in the scaling metric rather than a constant bias.