de.mpg.escidoc.pubman.appbase.FacesBean
Deutsch
 
Hilfe Wegweiser Impressum Kontakt Einloggen
  DetailsucheBrowse

Datensatz

DATENSATZ AKTIONENEXPORT

Freigegeben

Poster

The influence of dynamic and static adaptors on the magnitude of high-level aftereffects for dynamic facial expression

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83877

de la Rosa,  S
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84787

Giese,  MA
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83871

Curio,  C
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

Externe Ressourcen
Es sind keine Externen Ressourcen verfügbar
Volltexte (frei zugänglich)
Es sind keine frei zugänglichen Volltexte verfügbar
Ergänzendes Material (frei zugänglich)
Es sind keine frei zugänglichen Ergänzenden Materialien verfügbar
Zitation

de la Rosa, S., Giese, M., & Curio, C. (2011). The influence of dynamic and static adaptors on the magnitude of high-level aftereffects for dynamic facial expression. Poster presented at 34th European Conference on Visual Perception, Toulouse, France.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-BA90-0
Zusammenfassung
Adapting to an emotional facial expression biases emotional judgments of an ambiguous facial expression away from the adapted facial expression. Previous studies examining emotional facial adaptation effects used static emotional facial expressions as adaptors. Since natural facial expressions are inherently dynamic, dynamic information might enhance the magnitude of the emotional facial expression adaptation effect. We tested this hypothesis by comparing emotional facial expression adaptation effects for static and dynamic facial expression adaptors. Stimuli were generated using a dynamic 3D morphable face model. We found adaptation effects of similar magnitude for dynamic and static adaptors. When rigid head motion was removed (leaving only non-rigid intrinsic facial motion cues), the adaptation effects with dynamic adaptors disappeared. These results obtained with a novel method for the synthesis of facial expression stimuli suggest that at least part of the cognitive representation of facial expressions is dynamic and depends on head motion.