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Poster

The center-surround effect in visual speed estimation during walking

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83861

Chuang,  L
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83839

Bülthoff,  HH
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84228

Souman,  J
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Research Group Multisensory Perception and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Zitation

Chuang, L., Bülthoff, H., & Souman, J. (2011). The center-surround effect in visual speed estimation during walking. Poster presented at 34th European Conference on Visual Perception, Toulouse, France.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-BA8A-F
Zusammenfassung
Walking reduces visual speed estimates of optic flow (Souman et al, 2010 Journal of Vision 10(11):14]. Simultaneously, visual background motion can influence the perceived speed of moving objects (Tynan and Sekular, 1975 Vision Research 25 1231–1238; Baker and Graf, 2010 Vision Research 50 193–201). These two effects have been attributed to different subtractive processes, which may help in segregating object motion from self-motion induced optic flow. Here, we investigate how both factors jointly contribute to the perceived visual speed of objects. Participants compared the speed of two central Gabor patches on a ground plane, presented in consecutive intervals, either while standing still or while walking on a treadmill. In half the trials, one of the Gabors was surrounded by a moving random dot pattern, the speed of which matched walking speed. Our results replicated previous findings. A moving surround as well as walking can independently induce a subtractive effect on the perceived speed of the moving center, with the effect size increasing with center speed. However, walking does not affect visual speed estimates of the center when a visual surround is present. These results suggest that the visual input dominates the segregation of object motion from background optic flow.