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Attention But Not Awareness Modulates the BOLD Signal in the Human V1 During Binocular Suppression

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84301

Watanabe,  M
Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84099

Cheng K, Murayama,  Y
Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84063

Logothetis,  NK
Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Zitation

Watanabe, M., Cheng K, Murayama, Y., Ueno K, Asamizuya T, Tanaka, K., & Logothetis, N. (2011). Attention But Not Awareness Modulates the BOLD Signal in the Human V1 During Binocular Suppression. Science, 334(6057), 829-831. doi:10.1126/science.1203161.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-B8F8-B
Zusammenfassung
Although recent psychophysical studies indicate that visual awareness and top-down attention are two distinct processes, it is not clear how they are neurally dissociated in the visual system. Using a two-by-two factorial functional magnetic resonance imaging design with binocular suppression, we found that the visibility or invisibility of a visual target led to only nonsignificant blood oxygenation level–dependent (BOLD) effects in the human primary visual cortex (V1). Directing attention toward and away from the target had much larger and robust effects across all study participants. The difference in the lower-level limit of BOLD activation between attention and awareness illustrates dissociated neural correlates of the two processes. Our results agree with previously reported V1 BOLD effects on attention, while they invite a reconsideration of the functional role of V1 in visual awareness.