de.mpg.escidoc.pubman.appbase.FacesBean
English
 
Help Guide Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Poster

Electrophysiological Effects Of Lactate On Primary Visual Cortex Of Non-Human Primates

MPS-Authors
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84289

von Pföstl,  V
Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84324

Zaldivar,  D
Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84059

Li,  J
Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84502

Viswanath,  S
Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84329

Zhang,  X
Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84063

Logothetis,  NK
Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84158

Rauch,  A
Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;
Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

Locator
Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts available
Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

von Pföstl, V., Zaldivar, D., Li, J., Viswanath, S., Zhang, X., Logothetis, N., et al. (2012). Electrophysiological Effects Of Lactate On Primary Visual Cortex Of Non-Human Primates. Poster presented at 8th Forum of European Neuroscience (FENS 2012), Barcelona, Spain.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-B6D8-1
Abstract
Recent evidence suggests that increased metabolic demand of neurons can be met by lactate, a metabolite of glucose. In addition, during neuronal activation lactate production in the brain is increased. We already demonstrated that this physiological formation of lactate can contribute to the BOLD signal. Here we set out to determine the underlying mechanism that drives the observed increase in BOLD baseline. This effect could be explained by an increase in CBF or also increased neuronal activity. The influence of lactate on cerebral blood flow has been already established. To test if lactate has also an effect on neuronal activity we performed electrophysiological recordings in V1 of anesthetized non-human primates. Lactate was applied slow and continuously (0.04 mmol/kg/min). This infusion induced a significant increase in local field potential (LfpH, 24-90 Hz) power and visual stimulus induced modulation. An average increase of 23.0±1.2 and 76.0±20 was recorded for power and modulation of LfpH respectively; this effect reached significance 4.8±3.1 min after the start of the injection and lasted for 19.5±5.0 min. The timing of the effects is comparable to the timing of the BOLD signal increase evoked by the same infusion protocol of lactate. In the multiunit activity (MUA, 400-3000 Hz) no significant effect was observed. In summary, by applying lactate, a potential fuel for activated neurons, we increase LfpH power and modulation but not the spiking activity. Since LfpH is a reliable driver of the BOLD signal at least part of the lactate effect on the BOLD signal can be explained by an increase in neuronal activity.