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Poster

View dependencies in the visual recognition of social interactions

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83877

de la Rosa,  S
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83839

Miekes S, Bülthoff,  HH
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83871

Curio,  C
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Zitation

de la Rosa, S., Miekes S, Bülthoff, H., & Curio, C. (2012). View dependencies in the visual recognition of social interactions. Poster presented at 35th European Conference on Visual Perception, Alghero, Italy.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-B656-7
Zusammenfassung
Humans daily physically interact with other people (eg when shaking hands). Understanding the action of others is important for a successful social interaction. Little is known about the visual processes underlying the visual recognition of social interactions. Here we were examined the view dependency of social interaction recognition. We used motion capture to record predefined interactions (eg high five; handshake; hug) acted out by pairs of participants and created 3D models of these interactions. In the actual experiment participants were presented with these interactions one at a time and had to identify a predefined interaction (1IFC task). We manipulated the view point (front, side, top, 45 degree side view) from which participants saw the interaction and the presentation time of the social interactions. We recorded participants'accuracy (as measured by d prime) and reaction time to identify a predefined social interaction. We found that the d primes and reaction time significantly depended on the view point of the social interaction. The results suggest the existence of view dependencies in the visual recognition of social interactions.