de.mpg.escidoc.pubman.appbase.FacesBean
English
 
Help Guide Disclaimer Contact us Login
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Talk

The influence of different sources of visual information on joint action performance

MPS-Authors
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84240

Streuber,  S
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

Locator
There are no locators available
Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts available
Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Streuber, S. (2012). The influence of different sources of visual information on joint action performance. Talk presented at 13th Conference of the Junior Neuroscientists of Tübingen (NeNA 2012). Schramberg, Germany.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-B582-9
Abstract
Humans are social beings and they often act jointly together with other humans (joint actions) rather than alone. Successful joint action requires the understanding and the coordination of ones own actions with another persons actions. The research attempts to advance our knowledge about joint action coordination by extending existing research in two novel and important ways. First, prominent theories of joint action agree on visual information being critical for successful joint action coordination but are vague about the exact source of visual information being used during a joint action. However, in a real life interaction several sources of visual information exist which inform an interaction partner about the ongoing course of the interaction (e.g. visual information about objects, tools, other persons). Knowing which sources of visual information are used, however, is important for a more detailed characterization of the functioning of action coordination in joint actions. Second, previous studies investigating the role of visual information in social settings often constrain the experimental tasks to artificial laboratory settings. To examine joint action mechanisms under realistic conditions I devised experimental tasks that allowed a close-to-natural joint action. As a result the perceptual and motor components of the experimental tasks were less constrained allowing for a more natural interaction compared to previous studies. The current research examines the importance of different sources of visual information on joint action coordination under realistic settings. In three studies I examined the influence of different sources of visual information (Study 1), the functional role of different sources of visual information (Study 2), and the effect of social context on the use of visual information (Study 3) in a table tennis game. The results of these studies revealed that (1) visual anticipation of the interaction partner and the interaction object is critical in natural joint actions, (2) different sources of visual information are critical at different temporal phases during the joint action, and (3) the social context modulates the importance of different sources of visual information. In sum, this work provides important and new empirical evidence about the importance of different sources of visual information in close-to-natural joint actions.