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Journal Article

Three-Dimensional Assessment of Facial Development in Children With Unilateral Cleft Lip With and Without Alveolar Cleft

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http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83829

Kluba S, Breidt,  M
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons83839

Bacher M, Müller-Hagedorn S, Dietz K, Bülthoff,  HH
Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Krimmel, M., Kluba S, Breidt, M., Bacher M, Müller-Hagedorn S, Dietz K, Bülthoff, H., & Reinert, s. (2013). Three-Dimensional Assessment of Facial Development in Children With Unilateral Cleft Lip With and Without Alveolar Cleft. Journal of Craniofacial Surgery, 24(1), 313–316. doi:10.1097/SCS.0b013e318275ed60.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-B528-8
Abstract
Children with cleft lip or cleft lip and alveolus represent a minor group in the cleft population. The aim of this study was to analyze the faces of these children. In a prospective, cross-sectional study, 344 healthy children and 30 children with cleft lip or cleft lip and alveolus were scanned three-dimensionally at the age of 0 to 6 years. Twenty-one standard anthropometric landmarks were identified, and the images were superimposed. Growth curves for normal facial development were calculated. The facial morphology of cleft children was compared with that of unaffected children. Facial morphology and growth in the transverse direction of the examined patients appeared broadened in all levels. Especially the nasal landmarks indicated a widening of the nose. The landmarks ac l, sbal l, sbal r, c l, sn l, and ls l differed significantly from unaffected children. In the sagittal and vertical dimensions, there was no significant difference compared with unaffected children. Our study demonstrates that surgical and orthodontic treatment can restore the vertical and sagittal dimensions of the face in children with cleft lip with and without alveolar clefts; however, the transverse dimension—especially the nose—remains too broad.