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A genome-wide survey and functional brain imaging study identify CTNNBL1 as a memory-related gene

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http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons84187

Stefanova E, Vogler C, Gschwind L, Ackermann S, Spalek K, Rasch B, Heck A, Aerni A, Hanser E, Demougin P, Huynh K-D, Luechinger R, Klarhöfer M, Novakovic I, Kostic V, Boesiger P, Scheffler,  K
Department High-Field Magnetic Resonance, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Papassotiropoulos, A., Stefanova E, Vogler C, Gschwind L, Ackermann S, Spalek K, Rasch B, Heck A, Aerni A, Hanser E, Demougin P, Huynh K-D, Luechinger R, Klarhöfer M, Novakovic I, Kostic V, Boesiger P, Scheffler, K., & de Quervain, D.-F. (2013). A genome-wide survey and functional brain imaging study identify CTNNBL1 as a memory-related gene. Molecular Psychiatry, 18(2), 255–263. doi:10.1038/mp.2011.148.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-B4EA-9
Abstract
Unbiased genome-wide screens combined with imaging data on brain function may identify novel molecular pathways related to human cognition. Here we performed a dense genome-wide screen to identify episodic memory-related gene variants. A genomic locus encoding the brain-expressed beta-catenin-like protein 1 (CTNNBL1) was significantly (P=7 × 10−8) associated with verbal memory performance in a cognitively healthy cohort from Switzerland (n=1073) and was replicated in a second cohort from Serbia (n=524; P=0.003). Gene expression studies showed CTNNBL1 genotype-dependent differences in beta-catenin-like protein 1 mRNA levels in the human cortex. Functional magnetic resonance imaging in 322 subjects detected CTNNBL1 genotype-dependent differences in memory-related brain activations. Converging evidence from independent experiments and different methodological approaches suggests a role for CTNNBL1 in human memory.