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The effect of population structure on the rate of evolution

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons56872

Rainey,  Paul B.
External Scientific Member Group Experimental and Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons56973

Traulsen,  Arne
Research Group Evolutionary Theory, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

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Zitation

Frean, M., Rainey, P. B., & Traulsen, A. (2013). The effect of population structure on the rate of evolution. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 280(1762): 20130211. doi:10.1098/rspb.2013.0211.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-8253-A
Zusammenfassung
Ecological factors exert a range of effects on the dynamics of the evolutionary process. A particularly marked effect comes from population structure, which can affect the probability that new mutations reach fixation. Our interest is in population structures, such as those depicted by ‘star graphs’, that amplify the effects of selection by further increasing the fixation probability of advantageous mutants and decreasing the fixation probability of disadvantageous mutants. The fact that star graphs increase the fixation probability of beneficial mutations has lead to the conclusion that evolution proceeds more rapidly in star-structured populations, compared with mixed (unstructured) populations. Here, we show that the effects of population structure on the rate of evolution are more complex and subtle than previously recognized and drawattention to the importance of fixation time. By comparing population structures that amplify selection with other population structures, both analytically and numerically, we show that evolution can slow down substantially even in populations where selection is amplified