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Experimental Investigation of Crystal Shape Evolution During Growth and Dissolution

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http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons86260

Borchert,  Christian
Process Systems Engineering, Max Planck Institute for Dynamics of Complex Technical Systems, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons86497

Sundmacher,  Kai
Process Systems Engineering, Max Planck Institute for Dynamics of Complex Technical Systems, Max Planck Society;
Otto-von-Guericke-Universität Magdeburg, External Organizations;

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Citation

Singh, M. R., Boerrigter, S. X. M., Borchert, C., Sundmacher, K., & Ramkrishna, D. (2011). Experimental Investigation of Crystal Shape Evolution During Growth and Dissolution. Talk presented at 2011 AIChE Annual Meeting. Minneapolis, MN, USA. 2011-10-16 - 2011-10-21.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-8B1B-6
Abstract
Controlling crystal morphology is a hot topic in current research on crystalline materials for diverse industrial applications. In this connection, experimental detection of polymorphs through on-line measurement of crystal morphology in a crystallizer is a problem of crucial interest. XRD and Raman Spectroscopy are generally accepted as a primary method to identify polymorphs. We present evidence of a new, strikingly simple and inexpensive method of identifying polymorphs through computer-aided analysis of images produced with a Confocal microscope. This methodology has the following features. A software with an automated program for polymorph detection integrated with a Confocal microscope which can be used for on-line monitoring and control of particle shape, size and polymorph content. Different polymorphs can be identified by recognizing inter-planar angular patterns specific to a given polymorph. It yields the absolute amounts of different polymorphs present in a population of crystals. It has the potential for on-line measurement of 2D and 3D crystals of complex shapes. Consequently, this methodology can: Replace currently used FBRM (focused-beam reflectance measurement), digital video imaging and microscopy based sensors that have limitations with real shapes. Eliminate the need for multiple sensors currently used in industry.