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Herstellung moderner Grippeimpfstoffe : Zellkultur statt Hühnerei

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons86303

Genzel,  Yvonne
Bioprocess Engineering, Max Planck Institute for Dynamics of Complex Technical Systems, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons86291

Frensing,  Timo
Bioprocess Engineering, Max Planck Institute for Dynamics of Complex Technical Systems, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons86448

Reichl,  Udo
Otto-von-Guericke-Universität Magdeburg;
Bioprocess Engineering, Max Planck Institute for Dynamics of Complex Technical Systems, Max Planck Society;

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Zitation

Genzel, Y., Frensing, T., & Reichl, U. (2013). Herstellung moderner Grippeimpfstoffe: Zellkultur statt Hühnerei. Chemie in unserer Zeit, 47(1), 12-22. doi:10.1002/ciuz.201200606.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-87E2-4
Zusammenfassung
Today, about 95 % of the available influenza vaccine doses are still produced in embryonated chicken eggs. However, since the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic many people have realized that in case of a real threat, it might be difficult to guarantee the timely supply of a sufficient amount of vaccines. Therefore, it is of utmost importance to improve existing processes and to develop alternative manufacturing methods. The cell culture-based processes discussed in this manuscript represent a promising option to establish scalable and robust production processes. Probably these processes have not been pushed up to their limits yet. Further optimization concerning the design of bioprocesses and the optimization of biological systems involved could contribute significantly to increase yields and product quality. Copyright © 1999–2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All Rights Reserved. [accessed November 29th 2012]