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CAP, a new human suspension cell line for influenza virus production

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons86303

Genzel,  Yvonne
Bioprocess Engineering, Max Planck Institute for Dynamics of Complex Technical Systems, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons86251

Behrendt,  Ilona
Bioprocess Engineering, Max Planck Institute for Dynamics of Complex Technical Systems, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons86452

Rödig,  Jana
Bioprocess Engineering, Max Planck Institute for Dynamics of Complex Technical Systems, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons86442

Rapp,  Erdmann
Bioprocess Engineering, Max Planck Institute for Dynamics of Complex Technical Systems, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons86448

Reichl,  Udo
Otto-von-Guericke-Universität Magdeburg;
Bioprocess Engineering, Max Planck Institute for Dynamics of Complex Technical Systems, Max Planck Society;

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Zitation

Genzel, Y., Behrendt, I., Rödig, J., Rapp, E., Kueppers, C., Kochanek, S., et al. (2013). CAP, a new human suspension cell line for influenza virus production. Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology, 97(1), 111-122. doi:10.1007/s00253-012-4238-2.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0013-87D0-C
Zusammenfassung
Forced by major drawbacks of egg-based influenza virus production, several studies focused on the establishment and optimization of cell-based production systems. Among numerous possible host cell lines from duck, monkey, canine, chicken, mouse and human origin only a few will meet regulatory requirements, accomplish industrial standards and result in high virus titers. From primary virus isolation up to large scale manufacturing of human vaccines, however, the most logical choice seems to be the use of human cell lines. For this reason, we evaluated the recently established CAP cell line derived from human amniocytes for its potential in influenza virus production in suspension culture in small scale shaker flask and stirred tank bioreactor experiments. Different human and animal influenza viruses could be adapted to produce hemagglutination (HA) titers of at least 2.0 log10 HA units/100 µL without further process optimization. Adjusting trypsin activity as well as infection conditions (multiplicity of infection, infection medium) resulted in HA titers of up to 3.2 log10 HA units/100 µL and maximum cell-specific virus productivities of 6400 virions/cell (for human influenza A/PR/8/34 as a reference). Surface membrane expression of sialyloligosaccharides as well as HA N-glycosylation patterns were characterized. Overall, experimental results clearly demonstrate the potential of CAP cells for achieving high virus yields for different influenza strains, and the option to introduce a highly attractive fully characterized human cell line compliant with regulatory and industrial requirements as an alternative for influenza virus vaccine production. COPYRIGHT © Springer, Part of Springer Science+Business Media [accessed November 2nd 2012]