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New insights into subcomplex assembly and modifications of centrosomal proteins

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons50184

Habermann,  Karin
Dept. of Vertebrate Genomics (Head: Hans Lehrach), Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons50403

Lange,  Bodo M. H.
Dept. of Vertebrate Genomics (Head: Hans Lehrach), Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics, Max Planck Society;

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Habermann.pdf
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Zitation

Habermann, K., & Lange, B. M. H. (2012). New insights into subcomplex assembly and modifications of centrosomal proteins. Cell Division, 7(1): 7:17. doi:10.1186/1747-1028-7-17.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000E-F047-D
Zusammenfassung
This review provides a brief overview of the recent work on centrosome proteomics, protein complex identification and functional characterization with an emphasis on the literature of the last three years. Proteomics, genetic screens and comparative genomics studies in different model organisms have almost exhaustively identified the molecular components of the centrosome. However, much knowledge is still missing on the protein-protein interactions, protein modifications and molecular changes the centrosome undergoes throughout the cell cycle and development. The dynamic nature of this large multi-protein complex is reflected in the variety of annotated subcellular locations and biological processes of its proposed components. Some centrosomal proteins and complexes have been studied intensively in different organisms and provided detailed insight into centrosome functions. For example, the molecular, structural and functional characterization of the gamma-Tubulin ring complex (gamma-TuRC) and the the discovery of the Augmin/HAUS complex has advanced our understanding of microtubule (MT) capture, nucleation and organization. Surprising findings revealed new functions and localizations of proteins that were previously regarded as bona fide centriolar or centrosome components, e.g. at the kinetochore or in the nuclear pore complex regulating MT plus end capture or mRNA processing. Many centrosome components undergo posttranslational modifications such as phosphorylation, SUMOylation and ubiquitylation that are critical in modulating centrosome function and biology. A wealth of information has recently become available driven by new developments in technologies such as mass spectrometry, light and electron microscopy providing more detailed molecular and structural definition of the centrosome and particular roles of proteins throughout the cell cycle and development.