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Journal Article

Eye movements and lexical access in spoken-language comprehension: evaluating a linking hypothesis between fixations and linguistic processing.

MPS-Authors

Dahan,  Delphine
Language Comprehension Group, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society;
Phonological Learning for Speech Perception, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society;

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Tanenhaus_J_PsychoLing_Res_2000.pdf
(Publisher version), 137KB

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Citation

Tanenhaus, M. K., Magnuson, J. S., Dahan, D., & Chaimbers, G. (2000). Eye movements and lexical access in spoken-language comprehension: evaluating a linking hypothesis between fixations and linguistic processing. Journal of Psycholinguistic Research, 29, 557-580. doi:10.1023/A:1026464108329.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000E-E680-F
Abstract
A growing number of researchers in the sentence processing community are using eye movements to address issues in spoken language comprehension. Experiments using this paradigm have shown that visually presented referential information, including properties of referents relevant to specific actions, influences even the earliest moments of syntactic processing. Methodological concerns about task-specific strategies and the linking hypothesis between eye movements and linguistic processing are identified and discussed. These concerns are addressed in a review of recent studies of spoken word recognition which introduce and evaluate a detailed linking hypothesis between eye movements and lexical access. The results provide evidence about the time course of lexical activation that resolves some important theoretical issues in spoken-word recognition. They also demonstrate that fixations are sensitive to properties of the normal language-processing system that cannot be attributed to task-specific strategies