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A Systematic Mammalian Genetic Interaction Map Reveals Pathways Underlying Ricin Susceptibility

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http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons78085

Hein,  Marco Yannic
Mann, Matthias / Proteomics and Signal Transduction, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons78356

Mann,  Matthias
Mann, Matthias / Proteomics and Signal Transduction, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Bassik, M. C., Kampmann, M., Lebbink, R. J., Wang, S., Hein, M. Y., Poser, I., et al. (2013). A Systematic Mammalian Genetic Interaction Map Reveals Pathways Underlying Ricin Susceptibility. CELL, 152(4), 909-922. doi:10.1016/j.cell.2013.01.030.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000E-E5DC-7
Abstract
Genetic interaction (GI) maps, comprising pairwise measures of how strongly the function of one gene depends on the presence of a second, have enabled the systematic exploration of gene function in microorganisms. Here, we present a two-stage strategy to construct high-density GI maps in mammalian cells. First, we use ultracomplex pooled shRNA libraries (25 shRNAs/gene) to identify high-confidence hit genes for a given phenotype and effective shRNAs. We then construct double-shRNA libraries from these to systematically measure GIs between hits. A GI map focused on ricin susceptibility broadly recapitulates known pathways and provides many unexpected insights. These include a noncanonical role for COPI, a previously uncharacterized protein complex affecting toxin clearance, a specialized role for the ribosomal protein RPS25, and functionally distinct mammalian TRAPP complexes. The ability to rapidly generate mammalian GI maps provides a potentially transformative tool for defining gene function and designing combination therapies based on synergistic pairs.