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Tracking the autochthonous carbon transfer in stream biofilm food webs

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons62558

Seifert,  Anne-Gret
Molecular Biogeochemistry Group, Dr. G. Gleixner, Department Biogeochemical Processes, Prof. E.-D. Schulze, Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons62384

Gleixner,  Gerd
Molecular Biogeochemistry Group, Dr. G. Gleixner, Department Biogeochemical Processes, Prof. S. E. Trumbore, Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Zitation

Risse-Buhl, U., Trefzger, N., Seifert, A.-G., Schönborn, W., Gleixner, G., & Kusel, K. (2012). Tracking the autochthonous carbon transfer in stream biofilm food webs. FEMS Microbiology Ecology, 79(1), 118-131. doi:10.1111/j.1574-6941.2011.01202.x.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000E-DD8B-F
Zusammenfassung
Food webs in the rhithral zone rely mainly on allochthonous carbon from the riparian vegetation. However, autochthonous carbon might be more important in open canopy streams. In streams, most of the microbial activity occurs in biofilms, associated with the streambed. We followed the autochthonous carbon transfer toward bacteria and grazing protozoa within a stream biofilm food web. Biofilms that developed in a second-order stream (Thuringia, Germany) were incubated in flow channels under climate-controlled conditions. Six-week-old biofilms received either (13)C- or (12)C-labeled CO(2), and uptake into phospholipid fatty acids was followed. The dissolved inorganic carbon of the flow channel water became immediately labeled. In biofilms grown under 8-h light/16-h dark conditions, more than 50% of the labeled carbon was incorporated in biofilm algae, mainly filamentous cyanobacteria, pennate diatoms, and nonfilamentous green algae. A mean of 29% of the labeled carbon reached protozoan grazer. The testate amoeba Pseudodifflugia horrida was highly abundant in biofilms and seemed to be the most important grazer on biofilm bacteria and algae. Hence, stream biofilms dominated by cyanobacteria and algae seem to play an important role in the uptake of CO2 and transfer of autochthonous carbon through the microbial food web.