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Using drill resistance to quantify the density in coarse woody debris of Norway spruce

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons62606

Wirth,  C.
Research Group Organismic Biogeochemistry, Dr. C. Wirth, Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons62495

Mund,  M.
Department Biogeochemical Processes, Prof. E.-D. Schulze, Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons62339

Bönisch,  Gerhard
Research Group Organismic Biogeochemistry, Dr. C. Wirth, Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons62549

Schulze,  E.-D.
Department Biogeochemical Processes, Prof. E.-D. Schulze, Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Zitation

Kahl, T., Wirth, C., Mund, M., Bönisch, G., & Schulze, E.-D. (2009). Using drill resistance to quantify the density in coarse woody debris of Norway spruce. European Journal of Forest Research, 128(5), 467-473. doi:10.1007/s10342-009-0294-2.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000E-D836-6
Zusammenfassung
To evaluate the mass of coarse woody debris (CWD), it is necessary to quantify its density. Drill resistance measurements are introduced as a approach to estimate the density of CWD in different stages of decay. Dead logs of Norway spruce [Picea abies (L.) Karst.] from a Central European mountainous site were used as a test system to compare the new method with conventional predictors of wood density such as fast quantitative field estimates (e. g., knife probe) and classification of decay classes based on a set of qualitative traits and quantitative estimates. The model containing only drill resistance as a predictor explained 65% of the variation in wood density and was markedly better than models containing one or more of several conventional predictors. However, we show that the relationship between drill resistance and gravimetric wood density relationship is sensitive to the decay status. Therefore, the best model combines drill resistance and decay class (adj. R-2 = 0.732). An additional experiment showed that drill resistance is also sensitive to the moisture state (fresh vs. oven-dry) of the sample. The major potential of the method lies in its non-destructive nature which allows repeated sampling in long-term ecosystem studies or in protected areas where destructive sampling is prohibited. The limitations of the method are discussed and recommendations for applications are given.