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A ship-based methodology for high precision atmospheric oxygen measurements and its application in the Southern Ocean region

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons62582

Thompson,  R. L.
Tall Tower Atmospheric Gas Measurements, Dr. J. Lavrič, Department Biogeochemical Systems, Prof. M. Heimann, Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Thompson, R. L., Manning, A. C., Lowe, D. C., & Weatherburn, D. C. (2007). A ship-based methodology for high precision atmospheric oxygen measurements and its application in the Southern Ocean region. Tellus, Series B - Chemical and Physical Meteorology, 59(4), 643-653. doi:10.1111/j.1600-0889.2007.00292.x.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000E-D5FD-D
Zusammenfassung
A method for achieving continuous high precision measurements of atmospheric O-2 is presented based on a commercially available fuel-cell instrument, (Sable Systems, Oxzilla FC-II) with a precision of 7 per meg (approximately equivalent to 1.2 ppm) for a 6-min measurement. The Oxzilla was deployed on two voyages in the Western Pacific sector of the Southern Ocean, in February 2003 and in April 2004, making these the second set of continuous O-2 measurements ever made from a ship. The results show significant temporal variation in O-2, in the order of +/- 10 per meg over 6-hourly time intervals, and substantial spatial variation. Data from both voyages show an O-2 maximum centred on 50 degrees S, which is most likely to be the result of biologically driven O-2 outgassing in the region of subtropical convergence around New Zealand, and a decreasing O-2 trend towards Antarctica. O-2 from the ship-based measurements is elevated compared with measurements from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography flask-sampling network, and the O-2 maximum is also not captured in the network observations. This preliminary study shows that ship-based continuous measurements are a valuable addition to current fixed site sampling programmes for the understanding of ocean-atmosphere O-2 exchange processes. [References: 39]