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Mesoscale circulations over complex terrain in the Valencia coastal region, Spain - Part 2: Modeling CO2 transport using idealized surface fluxes

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http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons62552

Schumacher,  M.
Department Biogeochemical Systems, Prof. M. Heimann, Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Perez-Landa, G., Ciais, P., Gangoiti, G., Palau, J. L., Carrara, A., Gioli, B., et al. (2007). Mesoscale circulations over complex terrain in the Valencia coastal region, Spain - Part 2: Modeling CO2 transport using idealized surface fluxes. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 7(7), 1851-1868. doi:10.5194/acp-7-1835-2007.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000E-D5AA-5
Abstract
Vertical profiles of CO2 concentration were collected during an intensive summer campaign in a coastal complex-terrain region within the frame of the European Project RECAB ( Regional Assessment and Modelling of the Carbon Balance in Europe). The region presents marked diurnal mesoscale circulation patterns. These circulations result in a specific coupling between atmospherically transported CO2 and its surface fluxes. To understand the effects of this interaction on the spatial variability of the observed CO2 concentrations, we applied a high-resolution transport simulation to an idealized model of land biotic fluxes. The regional Net Ecosystem Exchange fluxes were extrapolated for different land-use classes by using a set of eddy-covariance measurements. The atmospheric transport model is a Lagrangian particle dispersion model, driven by a simulation of the RAMS mesoscale model. Our simulations were able to successfully reproduce some of the processes controlling the mesoscale transport of CO2. A semi-quantitative comparison between simulations and data allowed us to characterize how the coupling between mesoscale transport and surface fluxes produced CO2 spatial gradients in the domain. Temporal averages in the simulated CO2 field show a covariance between flux and transport consisting of: 1) horizontally, a CO2 deficit over land, mirrored by a CO2 excess over the sea and 2) vertically, the prevalence of a mean CO2 depletion between 500 and 2000 m, and a permanent build-up of CO2 in the lower levels. [References: 35]