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Pacific dominance to global air-sea CO2 flux variability: A novel atmospheric inversion agrees with ocean models

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http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons62529

Rödenbeck,  C.
Inverse Data-driven Estimation, Dr. C. Rödenbeck, Department Biogeochemical Systems, Prof. M. Heimann, Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons62402

Heimann,  M.
Department Biogeochemical Systems, Prof. M. Heimann, Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Mckinley, G. A., Rödenbeck, C., Gloor, M., Houweling, S., & Heimann, M. (2004). Pacific dominance to global air-sea CO2 flux variability: A novel atmospheric inversion agrees with ocean models. Geophysical Research Letters, 31(22), L22308. doi:10.1029/2004GL021069.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000E-D1EC-2
Abstract
We address an ongoing debate regarding the geographic distribution of interannual variability in ocean-atmosphere carbon exchange. We find that, for 1983-1998, both novel high-resolution atmospheric inversion calculations and global ocean biogeochemical models place the primary source of global CO2 air-sea flux variability in the Pacific Ocean. In the model considered here, this variability is clearly associated with the El Nino/Southern Oscillation cycle. Both methods also indicate that the Southern Ocean is the second-largest source of air-sea CO2 flux variability, and that variability is small throughout the Atlantic, including the North Atlantic, in contrast to previous studies. [References: 16]