de.mpg.escidoc.pubman.appbase.FacesBean
English
 
Help Guide Disclaimer Contact us Login
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

Intramolecular, compound-specific, and bulk carbon isotope patterns in C3 and C4 plants: a review and synthesis

MPS-Authors
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons62412

Hobbie,  E. A.
Department Biogeochemical Systems, Prof. D. Schimel, Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons62603

Werner,  R. A.
Service Facility Stable Isotope/Gas Analytics, Dr. W. A. Brand, Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, Max Planck Society;

Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts available
Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Hobbie, E. A., & Werner, R. A. (2004). Intramolecular, compound-specific, and bulk carbon isotope patterns in C3 and C4 plants: a review and synthesis. New Phytologist, 161(2), 371-385. doi:10.1111/j.1469-8137.2004.00970.x.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000E-D1AC-3
Abstract
Studies using carbon isotope differences between C-3 and C-4 photosynthesis to calculate terrestrial productivity or soil carbon turnover assume that intramolecular isotopic patterns and isotopic shifts between specific plant components are similar in C-3 and C-4 plants. To test these assumptions, we calculated isotopic differences in studies measuring components from C-3 or C-4 photosynthesis. Relative to source sugars in fermentation, C-3-derived ethanol had less C-13 and C-3-derived CO2 had more C-13 than C-4-derived ethanol and CO2. Both results agreed with intramolecular isotopic signatures in C-3 and C-4 glucose. Isotopic shifts between plant compounds (e.g. lignin and cellulose) or tissues (e.g. leaves and roots) also differed in C-3 and C-4 plants. Woody C-3 plants allocated more carbon to C-13-depleted compounds such as lignin or lipids than herbaceous C-3 or C-4 plants. This allocation influenced C-13 patterns among compounds and tissues. Photorespiration and isotopic fractionation at metabolic branch points, coupled to different allocation patterns during metabolism for C-3 vs C-4 plants, probably influence position-specific and compound-specific isotopic differences. Differing C-13 content of mobile and immobile compounds (e.g. sugars vs lignin) may then create isotopic differences among plant pools and along transport pathways. We conclude that a few basic mechanisms can explain intramolecular, compound-specific and bulk isotopic differences between C-3 and C-4 plants. Understanding these mechanisms will improve our ability to link bulk and compound-specific isotopic patterns to metabolic pathways in C-3 and C-4 plants.