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Journal Article

Using radiocarbon to determine the mycorrhizal status of fungi

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http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons62412

Hobbie,  E. A.
Department Biogeochemical Systems, Prof. D. Schimel, Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons62592

Van Klinken,  G. J.
Service Facility 14C Lab, Dr. Geert van Klinken, Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Hobbie, E. A., Weber, N. S., Trappe, J. M., & Van Klinken, G. J. (2002). Using radiocarbon to determine the mycorrhizal status of fungi. New Phytologist, 156(1), 129-136. doi:10.1046/j.1469-8137.2002.00496.x.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000E-CF07-2
Abstract
Measurements of C-13 in fungal sporocarps are useful in assessing mycorrhizal or saprotrophic status. Because C-14 measurements can indicate the age of fungal carbon (C) and mycorrhizal fungi depend closely on recent photosynthate, C-14 may provide additional insight into possible mycorrhizal status. Sporocarps, needles, and litter from Woods Creek, OR, USA together with archived sporocarps were measured for C-14 content by accelerator mass spectrometry. Known mycorrhizal fungi resembled current-year needles (Amanita, Cantharellus and Gomphidius) or atmospheric CO2 (Tuber) in C-14 and indicated an average age of 0-2 yr for incorporated C, whereas saprotrophic genera (Pleurocybella , Lepiota and Hypholoma) were composed of C at least 10 yr old. Of genera tentatively considered mycorrhizal from previous work with C-13, only Otidia and Sowerbyella appeared mycorrhizal from C-14 measurements, whereas Aleuria, Clavulina, Paurocotylis and Ramaria (sensu lato) consisted of older carbon and were presumably saprotrophic. C-14 clearly separated known mycorrhizal or saprotrophic fungi and indicated C-13 measurements should be interpreted cautiously on species of unknown status. C-14 results for needles and mycorrhizal fungi suggested that C sources other than atmospheric CO2 may contribute small amounts of C. Possible sources include storage of carbohydrates and amino acids, organic nitrogen uptake, and incorporation of soil-respired CO2 by anaplerotic or photosynthetic pathways.