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Finding Pulsars with Einstein@Home

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons1452

Knispel,  B.
Observational Relativity and Cosmology, AEI-Hannover, MPI for Gravitational Physics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons40518

Allen,  B.
Observational Relativity and Cosmology, AEI-Hannover, MPI for Gravitational Physics, Max Planck Society;

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Zitation

Knispel, B., Allen, B., Cordes, J., Deneva, J., Anderson, D., Aulbert, C., et al. (2011). Finding Pulsars with Einstein@Home. Bulletin of the American Astronomical Society, 43.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000E-B3EE-8
Zusammenfassung
The Einstein@Home project is a global distributed computing project and aggregates the computer power of hundreds of thousands of volunteers from 192 countries to "mine" large data sets. Its long-term goal is the detection of continuous gravitational waves in data from the LIGO interferometric gravitational wave detectors. Since March 2009 about a third of Einstein@Home's computation cycles is also used to search for tight binary pulsars in PALFA radio data from the Arecibo observatory. In July 2010, two new pulsars were found by Einstein@Home, J2007+2722 and J1952+26, the latter in a binary system with 9.4 hours orbital period. Here, we present an overview of the status of the Einstein@Home project and describe its search for radio pulsars in binaries with periods larger than 11 minutes. Further, we briefly review Einstein@Home's pulsar discoveries.