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Zeitschriftenartikel

Patterns and correlates of generalized anxiety disorder in community samples

MPG-Autoren

Kessler,  RC
Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, Max Planck Society;

Wittchen,  HU
Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, Max Planck Society;

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Zitation

Kessler, R., & Wittchen, H. (2002). Patterns and correlates of generalized anxiety disorder in community samples. Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 63(Suppl. 8), 4-10.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000E-A295-8
Zusammenfassung
Background: Although generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is at least twice as prevalent as panic disorder and is among the commonly occurring mental disorders, changing diagnostic criteria have hampered the cumulation of data on patterns and correlates. Method: A computer literature search was carried out for the terms generalized anxiety disorder and GAD in the MEDLINE and PsycLIT data-bases. Reports published in English since 1995 were reviewed to determine patterns and correlates of GAD in the general population. Results: The literature shows clearly that GAD is a commonly Occurring disorder associated with serious impairment. Although the high comorbidities of GAD with other disorders in clinical samples led to speculation that the impairments associated with GAD were due to comorbid conditions, several recent studies show that pure GAD is associated with serious impairments. Considerable uncertainty remains regarding appropriate diagnostic criteria. The requirements that the anxiety be excessive and persist for 6 months are the subject of the most controversy. Recently reported community epidemiologic data show that generalized anxiety syndromes that persist for shorter time periods and that axe not excessive in relation to objective stressors are as seriously impairing as syndromes that meet full criteria for GAD. It is less clear whether currently available treatments are as useful in resolving episodes of generalized anxiety that lie outside the boundaries Of current ICD and DSM criteria. Conclusion: GAD is a commonly occurring mental disorder that can seriously impair functioning. Coordinated community epidemiologic studies and treatment effectiveness studies a-re needed to resolve remaining uncertainties regarding the dignostic boundaries of GA