de.mpg.escidoc.pubman.appbase.FacesBean
Deutsch
 
Hilfe Wegweiser Impressum Kontakt Einloggen
  DetailsucheBrowse

Datensatz

DATENSATZ AKTIONENEXPORT

Freigegeben

Zeitschriftenartikel

The influence of polysomnography on the Multiple Sleep Latency Test and other measures of daytime sleepiness

MPG-Autoren

Wichniak,  A
Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, Max Planck Society;

Geisler,  P
Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, Max Planck Society;

Tracik,  F
Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, Max Planck Society;

Crönlein,  T
Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, Max Planck Society;

Morrissey,  SP
Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, Max Planck Society;

Zulley,  J
Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, Max Planck Society;

Externe Ressourcen
Es sind keine Externen Ressourcen verfügbar
Volltexte (frei zugänglich)
Es sind keine frei zugänglichen Volltexte verfügbar
Ergänzendes Material (frei zugänglich)
Es sind keine frei zugänglichen Ergänzenden Materialien verfügbar
Zitation

Wichniak, A., Geisler, P., Tracik, F., Crönlein, T., Morrissey, S., & Zulley, J. (2002). The influence of polysomnography on the Multiple Sleep Latency Test and other measures of daytime sleepiness. Physiology & Behavior, 75(1-2), 183-188.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000E-A24B-1
Zusammenfassung
Introduction: According to its guidelines, the Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT) should be performed following an all-night polysomnography (PSG). However, the sleep quality and consequently the MSLT results may be affected by PSG and by the fact that a subject sleeps under unfamiliar conditions. The aim of this study was to examine whether PSG performed in a sleep laboratory has any influence on the MSLT and other measures of daytime sleepiness. Methods: Twenty healthy subjects with a mean age of 35.9 +/- 10.1 years underwent two MSLT examinations, and the 2 examination days were at least 4 weeks apart. In addition, on each occasion a monotonous vigilance task (VT) was performed and the subjects were asked to fill out the Epworth Sleepiness (ESS) and Visual Analogue Scales (VAS). In a cross-over design, a group of 10 subjects underwent a MSLT (MSLT-P) following a PSG and, on a second occasion, a MSLT (MSLT-N) was performed without a prior PSG. Vice versa, a second group of 10 subjects underwent first MSLT-N and then MSLT-P. Results: None of the MSLT parameters differed significantly between MSLT-P and MSLT-N. The other measures of daytime sleepiness (VT, ESS, VAS) also showed no evidence of significant differences between days with and without a prior PSG. Conclusions: The results of MSLT and other measures of daytime sleepiness in healthy subjects are not influenced by the fact whether or not the subjects had a PSG the night prior to MSLT. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science Inc. All rights reserve