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The Munich vulnerability study on affective disorders: Stability of polysomnographic findings over time

MPG-Autoren

Modell,  S
Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, Max Planck Society;

Ising,  M
Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, Max Planck Society;

Holsboer,  F
Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, Max Planck Society;

Lauer,  CJ
Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, Max Planck Society;

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Zitation

Modell, S., Ising, M., Holsboer, F., & Lauer, C. (2002). The Munich vulnerability study on affective disorders: Stability of polysomnographic findings over time. Biological Psychiatry, 52(5), 430-437.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000E-A15F-E
Zusammenfassung
Background: Some of the sleep abnormalities found in depression also persist in remission, suggesting that these parameters could represent trait or vulnerability markers. In a previous study, we found that about one third of a group of high-risk probands (HRPs) showed sleep patterns that were comparable to those of depressed patients. In the present study, we re- investigated a subsample of these HRPs to evaluate the stability of these findings over time. Methods: We investigated the sleep-electroencephalograms of 82 healthy subjects with a high genetic load of affective disorders. We were able to re- investigate 26 of these HRPs after a mean interval of 3.5 years. Thirty-five unrelated control probands and 33 unrelated depressed inpatients that were recruited at the first investigation served as reference groups. Results: At index investigation, we found that the HRPs showed a significantly increased rapid eye movement (REM) sleep density, compared to control subjects. At the second examination, no changes of the polysomnographic observations over time could be observed; in particular, the REM density remained elevated. Conclusions: The increased REM density in high-risk subjects for an affective disorder at index investigation was stable over time, so that one of the requirements for a true vulnerability marker is fulfille