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Journal Article

Diurnal variations of interleukin-6 plasma levels are confounded by blood drawing procedures

MPS-Authors

Haack,  M
Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, Max Planck Society;

Kraus,  T
Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, Max Planck Society;

Schuld,  A
Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, Max Planck Society;

Dalal,  M
Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, Max Planck Society;

Koethe,  D
Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, Max Planck Society;

Pollmächer,  T
Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Haack, M., Kraus, T., Schuld, A., Dalal, M., Koethe, D., & Pollmächer, T. (2002). Diurnal variations of interleukin-6 plasma levels are confounded by blood drawing procedures. Psychoneuroendocrinology, 27(8), 921-931.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000E-A019-0
Abstract
Recent findings suggest that inflammatory cytokines are involved in sleep regulation. In part, this idea is based on studies showing that systemic levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) are affected by sleep and sleep deprivation. However, intravenous (IV) catheters used for repetitive blood sampling were reported to increase local IL-6 production, which might confound sleep-dependent or circadian changes in the plasma concentrations of this cytokine. To further examine the effects of blood drawing procedures on IL-6 plasma levels, 12 healthy young male subjects participated in a 24-h cross-over study protocol involving sleep and sleep deprivation. Blood was collected half-hourly through an IV line and one additional sample was taken by a simple needle stick from the contralateral arm in parallel to the last sample from the catheter. Difficulties in blood sampling, the plasma levels of IL-6, cortisol and subjective sleepiness were quantified. In samples from the IV line there was a linear increase in IL-6 levels in both conditions, whereas the amount of IL-6 detected in the needle stick sample at the end did not differ from baseline. IL-6 levels were significantly higher in samples rated as difficult and those difficulties were more frequent during sleep compared to nocturnal wakefulness. IL-6 levels did not correlate to variations in sleepiness or cortisol levels. We conclude that variations in IL-6 plasma levels measured in samples from an IV catheter are caused, at least in part, by changes in local cytokine production rather than by physiological changes in circulating IL-6 levels. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved