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The genome sequence of Schizosaccharomyces pombe

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons73747

Borzym,  K.
Mechanisms of Transcriptional Regulation (Sebastiaan H. Meijsing), Dept. of Computational Molecular Biology (Head: Martin Vingron), Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics, Max Planck Society;

Langer,  I.
Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons50090

Beck,  A.
Computing (Head: Donald Buczek/Peter Marquardt), Scientific Service (Head: Christoph Krukenkamp), Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons50409

Lehrach,  H.
Dept. of Vertebrate Genomics (Head: Hans Lehrach), Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons50488

Reinhardt,  R.
High Throughput Technologies, Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics, Max Planck Society;

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Zitation

Wood, V., Gwilliam, R., Rajandream, M. A., Lyne, M., Lyne, R., Stewart, A., et al. (2002). The genome sequence of Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Nature, 415(6874), 871-880.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0010-8C4E-E
Zusammenfassung
We have sequenced and annotated the genome of fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe), which contains the smallest number of protein-coding genes yet recorded for a eukaryote: 4,824. The centromeres are between 35 and 110 kilobases (kb) and contain related repeats including a highly conserved 1.8-kb element. Regions upstream of genes are longer than in budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), possibly reflecting more-extended control regions. Some 43% of the genes contain introns, of which there are 4,730. Fifty genes have significant similarity with human disease genes; half of these are cancer related. We identify highly conserved genes important for eukaryotic cell organization including those required for the cytoskeleton, compartmentation, cell-cycle control, proteolysis, protein phosphorylation and RNA splicing. These genes may have originated with the appearance of eukaryotic life. Few similarly conserved genes that are important for multicellular organization were identified, suggesting that the transition from prokaryotes to eukaryotes required more new genes than did the transition from unicellular to multicellular organization.