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Journal Article

Activity of E2F-dependent promoters in bladder carcinoma cells and their use for tumour-specific targeting of p53-induced apoptosis

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http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons50571

Steinhoff,  Christine
Dept. of Computational Molecular Biology (Head: Martin Vingron), Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Steinhoff, C., Prior, A., Reichmann, G., Seifert, H.-H., & Schulz, W. A. (2002). Activity of E2F-dependent promoters in bladder carcinoma cells and their use for tumour-specific targeting of p53-induced apoptosis. International Journal of Oncology, 21(5), 1033-1040.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0010-8B87-7
Abstract
Abstract. Inactivation of P53 and RB functions are crucial changes in bladder cancer (TCC). High-level re-expression of P53 elicits apoptosis in TCC cell lines, but also - as shown here - in normal uroepithelial cells. Compromised RB function is thought to cause increased activity of E2F-dependent promoters in carcinoma cells. Indeed, several, but not all E2F-dependent promoters were stronger in TCC lines than in normal cells, with the highest activities in cell lines lacking RB rather than p16INK4A. Re-expression of p53 from an E2F-dependent promoter suppressed clone formation and induced apoptosis in TCC lines as efficiently as expression from the stronger RSV-LTR or LINE-1 promoters. In normal cells, p53 expression from an E2F-dependent promoter was tolerated, whereas expression from both stronger promoters was lethal. Thus, specific E2F-dependent promoters allow adjustment of p53 expression to selectively induce apoptosis in TCC vs. normal uroepithelial cells. This approach could be useful in targeting apoptosis to TCC and other carcinomas lacking p53 and RB function.