de.mpg.escidoc.pubman.appbase.FacesBean
English
 
Help Guide Disclaimer Contact us Login
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Conference Paper

Functional inference from non-random distributions of conserved predicted transcription factor binding sites

MPS-Authors

Dieterich,  Christoph
Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons50480

Rahmann,  Sven
Dept. of Computational Molecular Biology (Head: Martin Vingron), Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons50613

Vingron,  Martin
Gene regulation (Martin Vingron), Dept. of Computational Molecular Biology (Head: Martin Vingron), Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics, Max Planck Society;

Locator
There are no locators available
Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts available
Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Dieterich, C., Rahmann, S., & Vingron, M. (2004). Functional inference from non-random distributions of conserved predicted transcription factor binding sites. Bioinformatics, 20(Suppl.), i109-i115.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0010-88B7-4
Abstract
Motivation: Our understanding of how genes are regulated in a concerted fashion is still limited. Especially, complex phenomena like cell cycle regulation in multicellular organisms are poorly understood. Therefore, we investigated conserved predicted transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) in man–mouse upstream regions of genes that can be associated to a particular cell cycle phase in HeLa cells. TFBSs were predicted from selected binding site motifs (represented by position weight matrices, PWMs) based on a statistical approach. A regulatory role for a transcription factor is more probable if its predicted TFBSs are enriched in upstream regions of genes, that are associated with a subset of cell cycle phases. We tested for this association by computing exact P-values for the observed phase distributions under the null distribution defined by the relative amount of conserved upstream sequence of genes per cell cycle phase. We considered non-exonic and 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) binding sites separately and corrected for multiple testing by taking the false discovery rate into account. Results: We identified 22 non-exonic and 11 5'-UTR significant PWM phase distributions although expecting one false discovery. Many of the corresponding transcription factors (e.g. members of the thyroid hormone/retinoid receptor subfamily) have already been associated with cell cycle regulation, proliferation and development. It appears that our method is a suitable tool for detecting putative cell cycle regulators in the realm of known human transcription factors.