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Journal Article

Mouse splice mutant generation from ENU-treated ES cells — a gene-driven approach

MPS-Authors

Greber,  Boris
Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons50409

Lehrach,  Hans
Dept. of Vertebrate Genomics (Head: Hans Lehrach), Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons50203

Himmelbauer,  Heinz
Dept. of Vertebrate Genomics (Head: Hans Lehrach), Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics, Max Planck Society;

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Greber et al. - Genomics.pdf
(Any fulltext), 288KB

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Citation

Greber, B., Lehrach, H., & Himmelbauer, H. (2005). Mouse splice mutant generation from ENU-treated ES cells — a gene-driven approach. Genomics, 85(5), 557-562. doi:10.1016/j.ygeno.2005.01.011.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0010-86BE-8
Abstract
Mutant mice are important for elucidating mammalian gene functions and for modeling human disease phenotypes. In recent years, chemical mutagenesis has become an increasingly popular method to disrupt gene functions due to its high efficiency of inducing mutations throughout the genome. Mutagenesis of embryonic stem (ES) cells offers the possibility of gene-driven approaches, which, however, require efficient mutation detection procedures to screen archives of mutated samples for lesions in particular genes. We have developed an approach that focuses on the detection of splice mutations in highly pooled cDNA samples using exon-skipping PCR primers. As a proof of concept, splice mutants for the Kit gene were isolated from a library comprising approximately 40,000 ES cell clones treated with N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea followed by transmission through the mouse germ-line. The approach will be useful for the production of mouse models for human disease-related splice mutations and as a general gene disruption strategy.