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Comparative expression pattern of Odd-skipped related genes Osr1 and Osr2 in chick embryonic development

MPS-Authors
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons50578

Stricker,  Sigmar
Research Group Development & Disease (Head: Stefan Mundlos), Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons50112

Brieske,  Norbert
Research Group Development & Disease (Head: Stefan Mundlos), Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics, Max Planck Society;

Haupt,  Julia
Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons50437

Mundlos,  Stefan
Research Group Development & Disease (Head: Stefan Mundlos), Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics, Max Planck Society;

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Stricker.pdf
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Citation

Stricker, S., Brieske, N., Haupt, J., & Mundlos, S. (2006). Comparative expression pattern of Odd-skipped related genes Osr1 and Osr2 in chick embryonic development. Gene Expression Patterns, 6(8), 826-834. doi:10.1016/j.modgep.2006.02.003.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0010-8395-5
Abstract
Odd-skipped genes encode zinc-finger transcription factors with widespread roles in embryonic development. In Drosophila, odd-skipped acts as a pair-rule gene, while its orthologous gene in Caenorhabditis elegans is involved in gut development. In mammals two paralogs exist, Osr1 and Osr2, with functions described in heart and urogenital, and in secondary palate development, respectively. As the chicken embryo is a widely used system for analysing gene function in vivo, we determined the expression pattern of the two chicken orthologues, cOsr1 and cOsr2, during embryonic development. We demonstrate expression of both genes in a variety of organs and structures, such as kidney, eye, branchial arches and dermis. Both genes show a highly dynamic expression pattern with partially overlapping, but mostly distinct domains of expression. Special emphasis in this study was laid on the investigation of cOsr1 and cOsr2 in limb development, where we compared their expression pattern with the expression of Osr1 and Osr2 in the mouse.