de.mpg.escidoc.pubman.appbase.FacesBean
English
 
Help Guide Disclaimer Contact us Login
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

An entropic characterization of protein interaction networks and cellular robustness

MPS-Authors
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons50420

Manke,  Thomas
Dept. of Computational Molecular Biology (Head: Martin Vingron), Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons50133

Demetrius,  Lloyd
Dept. of Computational Molecular Biology (Head: Martin Vingron), Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons50613

Vingron,  Martin
Gene regulation (Martin Vingron), Dept. of Computational Molecular Biology (Head: Martin Vingron), Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics, Max Planck Society;

Locator
There are no locators available
Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts available
Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Manke, T., Demetrius, L., & Vingron, M. (2006). An entropic characterization of protein interaction networks and cellular robustness. Interface: Journal of the Royal Society, 11(3), 843-850. doi:10.1098/rsif.2006.0140.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0010-82FB-9
Abstract
The structure of molecular networks is believed to determine important aspects of their cellular function, such as the organismal resilience against random perturbations. Ultimately, however, cellular behaviour is determined by the dynamical processes, which are constrained by network topology. The present work is based on a fundamental relation from dynamical systems theory, which states that the macroscopic resilience of a steady state is correlated with the uncertainty in the underlying microscopic processes, a property that can be measured by entropy. Here, we use recent network data from large-scale protein interaction screens to characterize the diversity of possible pathways in terms of network entropy. This measure has its origin in statistical mechanics and amounts to a global characterization of both structural and dynamical resilience in terms of microscopic elements. We demonstrate how this approach can be used to rank network elements according to their contribution to network entropy and also investigate how this suggested ranking reflects on the functional data provided by gene knockouts and RNAi experiments in yeast and Caenorhabditis elegans. Our analysis shows that knockouts of proteins with large contribution to network entropy are preferentially lethal. This observation is robust with respect to several possible errors and biases in the experimental data. It underscores the significance of entropy as a fundamental invariant of the dynamical system, and as a measure of structural and dynamical properties of networks. Our analytical approach goes beyond the phenomenological studies of cellular robustness based on local network observables, such as connectivity. One of its principal achievements is to provide a rationale to study proxies of cellular resilience and rank proteins according to their importance within the global network context.