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Dynamic rerouting of the carbohydrate flux is key to counteracting oxidative stress

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http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons50483

Ralser,  Markus
Dept. of Vertebrate Genomics (Head: Hans Lehrach), Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons50393

Kowald,  Axel
Independent Junior Research Groups (OWL), Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons50166

Gerisch,  Birgit
Ribosomes, Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons50384

Klipp,  Edda
Independent Junior Research Groups (OWL), Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons50409

Lehrach,  Hans
Dept. of Vertebrate Genomics (Head: Hans Lehrach), Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons50396

Krobitsch,  Sylvia
Neurodegenerative Disorders (Sylvia Krobitsch), Independent Junior Research Groups (OWL), Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Ralser, M., Wamelink, M. M., Kowald, A., Gerisch, B., Heeren, G., Struys, E. A., et al. (2007). Dynamic rerouting of the carbohydrate flux is key to counteracting oxidative stress. Journal of Biology, 6(4), 10-10. doi:10.1186/jbiol61.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0010-82DC-F
Abstract
Background Eukaryotic cells have evolved various response mechanisms to counteract the deleterious consequences of oxidative stress. Among these processes, metabolic alterations seem to play an important role. Results We recently discovered that yeast cells with reduced activity of the key glycolytic enzyme triosephosphate isomerase exhibit an increased resistance to the thiol-oxidizing reagent diamide. Here we show that this phenotype is conserved in Caenorhabditis elegans and that the underlying mechanism is based on a redirection of the metabolic flux from glycolysis to the pentose phosphate pathway, altering the redox equilibrium of the cytoplasmic NADP(H) pool. Remarkably, another key glycolytic enzyme, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), is known to be inactivated in response to various oxidant treatments, and we show that this provokes a similar redirection of the metabolic flux. Conclusion The naturally occurring inactivation of GAPDH functions as a metabolic switch for rerouting the carbohydrate flux to counteract oxidative stress. As a consequence, altering the homoeostasis of cytoplasmic metabolites is a fundamental mechanism for balancing the redox state of eukaryotic cells under stress conditions.