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Journal Article

Effect of Tryptophan Hydroxylase 1 Deficiency on the Development of Hypoxia-Induced Pulmonary Hypertension.

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http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons50622

Walther,  Diego J.
Dept. of Human Molecular Genetics (Head: Hans-Hilger Ropers), Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Morecroft, I., Dempsie, Y., Bader, M., Walther, D. J., Kotnik, K., Loughlin, L., et al. (2007). Effect of Tryptophan Hydroxylase 1 Deficiency on the Development of Hypoxia-Induced Pulmonary Hypertension. Hypertension, 49(1), 232-236. doi:10.1161/01.HYP.0000252210.58849.78.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0010-827E-1
Abstract
Tryptophan hydroxylase 1 catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the synthesis of serotonin in the periphery. Recently, it has been shown that expression of the tryptophan hydroxylase 1 gene is increased in lungs and pulmonary endothelial cells from patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension. Here we investigated the effect of genetic deletion of tryptophan hydroxylase 1 on hypoxia-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension in mice by measuring pulmonary hemodynamics and pulmonary vascular remodeling before and after 2 weeks of hypoxia. In wild-type mice, hypoxia increased right ventricular pressure and pulmonary vascular remodeling. These effects of hypoxia were attenuated in the tryptophan hydroxylase 1–/–mice. Hypoxia increased right ventricular hypertrophy in both wild-type and tryptophan hydroxylase 1–/–mice suggesting that in vivo peripheral serotonin has a differential effect on the pulmonary vasculature and right ventricular hypertrophy. Contractile responses to serotonin were increased in pulmonary arteries from tryptophan hydroxylase 1–/–mice. Hypoxia increased serotonin-mediated contraction in vessels from the wild-type mice, but this was not further increased by hypoxia in the tryptophan hydroxylase 1–/–mice. In conclusion, these results indicate that tryptophan hydroxylase 1 and peripheral serotonin play an essential role in the development of hypoxia-induced elevations in pulmonary pressures and hypoxia-induced pulmonary vascular remodeling. In addition, the results suggest that, in mice, serotonin has differential effects on the pulmonary vasculature and right ventricular hypertrophy.