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Chromosome mobility during meiotic prophase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons50515

Scherthan,  Harry
Dept. of Human Molecular Genetics (Head: Hans-Hilger Ropers), Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons50053

Adelfalk,  Caroline
Dept. of Human Molecular Genetics (Head: Hans-Hilger Ropers), Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics, Max Planck Society;

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Zitation

Scherthan, H., Wang, H., Adelfalk, C., White, E. J., Cowan, C., Cande, W. Z., et al. (2007). Chromosome mobility during meiotic prophase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America: PNAS, 104(43), 16934-16939. doi:10.1073/pnas.0704860104.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0010-8173-0
Zusammenfassung
In many organisms, a synaptonemal complex (SC) intimately connects each pair of homologous chromosomes during much of the first meiotic prophase and is thought to play a role in regulating recombination. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the central element of each SC contains Zip1, a protein orthologous to mammalian SYCP1. To study the dynamics of SCs in living meiotic cells, a functional ZIP1::GFP fusion was introduced into yeast and analyzed by fluorescence video microscopy. During pachytene, SCs exhibited dramatic and continuous movement throughout the nucleus, traversing relatively large distances while twisting, folding, and unfolding. Chromosomal movements were accompanied by changes in the shape of the nucleus, and all movements were reversibly inhibited by the actin antagonist Latrunculin B. Normal movement required the NDJ1 gene, which encodes a meiosis-specific telomere protein needed for the attachment of telomeres to the nuclear periphery and for normal kinetics of recombination and meiosis. These results show that SC movements involve telomere attachment to the nuclear periphery and are actin-dependent and suggest these movements could facilitate completion of meiotic recombination.