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Journal Article

Transcriptional Autoregulatory Loops Are Highly Conserved in Vertebrate Evolution

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http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons50380

Kielbasa,  Szymon M.
Dept. of Computational Molecular Biology (Head: Martin Vingron), Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons50613

Vingron,  Martin
Gene regulation (Martin Vingron), Dept. of Computational Molecular Biology (Head: Martin Vingron), Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics, Max Planck Society;

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journal.pone.0003210.pdf
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Citation

Kielbasa, S. M., & Vingron, M. (2008). Transcriptional Autoregulatory Loops Are Highly Conserved in Vertebrate Evolution. PLoS One, 3(9), e3210-e3210. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0003210.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0010-7F13-8
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Feedback loops are the simplest building blocks of transcriptional regulatory networks and therefore their behavior in the course of evolution is of prime interest. METHODOLOGY: We address the question of enrichment of the number of autoregulatory feedback loops in higher organisms. First, based on predicted autoregulatory binding sites we count the number of autoregulatory loops. We compare it to estimates obtained either by assuming that each (conserved) gene has the same chance to be a target of a given factor or by assuming that each conserved sequence position has an equal chance to be a binding site of the factor. CONCLUSIONS: We demonstrate that the numbers of putative autoregulatory loops conserved between human and fugu, danio or chicken are significantly higher than expected. Moreover we show, that conserved autoregulatory binding sites cluster close to the factors' starts of transcription. We conclude, that transcriptional autoregulatory feedback loops constitute a core transcriptional network motif and their conservation has been maintained in higher vertebrate organism evolution.