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Stemming cancer : functional genomics of cancer stem cells in solid tumors

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http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons50487

Regenbrecht,  Christian R. A.
Molecular Embryology and Aging (James Adjaye), Dept. of Vertebrate Genomics (Head: Hans Lehrach), Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons50409

Lehrach,  Hans
Dept. of Vertebrate Genomics (Head: Hans Lehrach), Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons50054

Adjaye,  James
Molecular Embryology and Aging (James Adjaye), Dept. of Vertebrate Genomics (Head: Hans Lehrach), Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Regenbrecht, C. R. A., Lehrach, H., & Adjaye, J. (2008). Stemming cancer: functional genomics of cancer stem cells in solid tumors. Stem Cell Reviews, 4(4), 319-328. doi:10.1007/s12015-008-9034-0.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0010-7EB3-A
Abstract
Cancer stem cells (CSCs) were discovered about 15 years ago in hematopoietic cancers. Subsequently, cancer stem cells were discovered in various solid tumors. Based on parallels with normal stem cells, a developmental process of cancer stem cells follows paths of organized, hierarchical structure of cells with different degrees of maturity. While some investigators have reported particular markers as identification of cancer stem cells, these markers require further research. In this review, we focus on the functional genomics of cancer stem cells. Functional genomics provides useful information on the signaling pathways which are consecutively activated or inactivated amongst those cells. This information is of particular importance for cancer research and clinical treatment in many respects. (1) Understanding of self-renewal mechanisms crucial to tumor growth. (2) Allow the identification of new, more specific marker for CSCs, and (3) pathways that are suitable as future targets for anti-cancer drugs. This is of particular importance, because today’s chemotherapy targets the proliferating cancer cells sparing the relatively slow dividing cancer stem cells. The first step on this long road therefore is to analyze genome-wide expression-profiles within the same type of cancer and then between different types of cancer, encircling those target genes and pathways, which are specific to these cells.