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Polymorphism and locus-specific effects on polymorphism at microsatellite loci in natural Drosophila melanogaster populations

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Zitation

Schlötterer, C., Vogl, C., & Tautz, D. (1997). Polymorphism and locus-specific effects on polymorphism at microsatellite loci in natural Drosophila melanogaster populations. Genetics, 146(1), 309-320.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0010-0ED5-4
Zusammenfassung
We have studied the natural variation at microsatellite loci in two African and five non-African populations of Drosophila melanogaster. Ten dinucleotide simple sequence loci were cloned from chromosomally mapped P1 clones and typed for single individuals from isofemale lines of the respective populations. We find that the African populations harbor the largest degree of diversity, while the non-African populations show a lower diversity. This supports previous results that D. melanogaster originated in Africa and spread across the rest of the world in historic times. Using genetic distance measures, we find also a distinct population subdivision between the non-African populations. Most interestingly, we find for some loci in some populations a strongly reduced variability, which cannot be explained by bottleneck effects. Employing a conservative test based on the variance in repeat number, we find that at least one locus in one population deviates significantly from the expectations of mutation-drift equilibrium. We suggest that this may be due to a recent selective sweep in this chromosomal region that may have been caused by a linked locus that was involved in local adaptation of the population.