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Journal Article

Excavation of a chimpanzee stone tool site in the African rainforest

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http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons72593

Boesch,  Christophe
Department of Primatology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Mercader, J., Panger, M. A., & Boesch, C. (2002). Excavation of a chimpanzee stone tool site in the African rainforest. Science, 296(5572), 1452-1455. doi:10.1126/science.1070268.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0010-076D-E
Abstract
Chimpanzees from the Tai forest of Cote d'lvoire produce unintentional flaked stone assemblages at nut-cracking sites, leaving behind a record of tool use and plant consumption that is recoverable with archaeological methods. About 40 kilograms of nutshell and 4 kilograms of stone were excavated at the Panda 100 site. The data unearthed show that chimpanzees transported stones from outcrops and soils to focal points, where they used them as hammers to process foodstuff. The repeated use of activity areas led to refuse accumulation and site formation. The implications of these data for the interpretation of the earliest hominin archaeological record are explored.