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Extreme mtDNA homogeneity in continental Asian populations

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons72894

Oota,  Hiroshi
Department of Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons72789

Kitano,  Takashi
Department of Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons72992

Stoneking,  Mark
Department of Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Max Planck Society;
Human Population History, Department of Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Max Planck Society;

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Zitation

Oota, H., Kitano, T., Jin, F., Yuasa, I., Wang, L., Ueda, S., et al. (2002). Extreme mtDNA homogeneity in continental Asian populations. American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 118(2), 146-153. doi:10.1002/ajpa.10056.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-0010-0765-D
Zusammenfassung
Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation in continental Asia has not been well-studied. Here, we report mtDNA HV1 sequences for 84 Xi'an and 82 Changsha Han Chinese, 89 Honshu Japanese, and 35 Vietnamese. Comparison of these sequences with other Asian mtDNA sequences reveals high variability within populations, but extremely low differentiation among Asian populations. Correlations between genetic distance and geographic distance, based on mtDNA and Y chromosome variation, indicate a higher migration rate in females than in males. This may reflect patrilocality, as suggested previously, but another plausible hypothesis is that the demographic expansion associated with the spread of agriculture in Asia may be responsible for the extreme genetic homogeneity in Asia. (C) 2002 Wiley-Liss.