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A neurocognitive perspective on rhyme awareness: The N450 rhyme effect

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons1156

Van Alphen,  Petra M.
Neurobiology of Language Department, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons69

Hagoort,  Peter
Neurobiology of Language Department, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society;
Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, External Organizations;

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Wagensveld_et_al_Brain_Res_2012.pdf
(Verlagsversion), 548KB

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Zitation

Wagensveld, B., Segers, E., Van Alphen, P. M., Hagoort, P., & Verhoeven, L. (2012). A neurocognitive perspective on rhyme awareness: The N450 rhyme effect. Brain Research, 1483, 63-70. doi:10.1016/j.brainres.2012.09.018.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-EE40-C
Zusammenfassung
Rhyme processing is reflected in the electrophysiological signals of the brain as a negative deflection for non-rhyming as compared to rhyming stimuli around 450 ms after stimulus onset. Studies have shown that this N450 component is not solely sensitive to rhyme but also responds to other types of phonological overlap. In the present study, we examined whether the N450 component can be used to gain insight into the global similarity effect, indicating that rhyme judgment skills decrease when participants are presented with word pairs that share a phonological overlap but do not rhyme (e.g., bell–ball). We presented 20 adults with auditory rhyming, globally similar overlapping and unrelated word pairs. In addition to measuring behavioral responses by means of a yes/no button press, we also took EEG measures. The behavioral data showed a clear global similarity effect; participants judged overlapping pairs more slowly than unrelated pairs. However, the neural outcomes did not provide evidence that the N450 effect responds differentially to globally similar and unrelated word pairs, suggesting that globally similar and dissimilar non-rhyming pairs are processed in a similar fashion at the stage of early lexical access.