de.mpg.escidoc.pubman.appbase.FacesBean
English
 
Help Guide Disclaimer Contact us Login
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT

Released

Journal Article

Cannibalism in Cyclops abyssorum

MPS-Authors
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons56605

Van Den Bosch,  Frank
Department Ecophysiology, Max Planck Institute for Limnology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons56898

Santer,  Barbara
Department Ecophysiology, Max Planck Institute for Limnology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

Locator
There are no locators available
Fulltext (public)
There are no public fulltexts available
Supplementary Material (public)
There is no public supplementary material available
Citation

Van Den Bosch, F., & Santer, B. (1993). Cannibalism in Cyclops abyssorum. Oikos, 67(1), 19-28.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-E3F6-E
Abstract
We study cannibalism in the cyclopoid copepod Cyclops abyssorum (Sars). The functional response of predatory stages Of C. abyssorum on inter- and conspecific prey is determined. Methods are developed to calculate the impact of cannibalism on populations. Four whole-lake studies found in the literature provide sufficient data to apply the methods. For these populations we calculate: 1. The cannibalism induced naupliar death-rate, CID. 2. The probability that a nauplius falls victim to cannibalism before reaching the copepodite stage, P(cann). 3. The percentage of the total amount of food ingested by the predator which is due to cannibalism, PWIC. P(cann) is on average 20% with a maximum of 80%. We conclude that cannibalism is an important factor in naupliar mortality. CID is on average 0.007 d-1 with a maximum of 0.026 d-1. PWIC shows a seasonal trend with minima in summer and maxima in winter. In winter conspecific nauplii constitute up to 45% of the total dry weight ingested by adult females. PWIC is smaller in lakes with larger alternative prey populations. Consequences for the dynamics of C. abyssorum populations are discussed.