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Journal Article

Zooplankton-mediated changes of bacterial community structure

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http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons56752

Jürgens,  K.
Department Ecophysiology, Max Planck Institute for Limnology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons56577

Arndt,  H.
Department Ecophysiology, Max Planck Institute for Limnology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons56890

Rothhaupt,  K. O.
Department Ecophysiology, Max Planck Institute for Limnology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

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Jürgens, K., Arndt, H., & Rothhaupt, K. O. (1994). Zooplankton-mediated changes of bacterial community structure. Microbial Ecology, 27(1), 27-42.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-E3A0-0
Abstract
Enclosure experiments in the mesotrophic Schohsee in northern Germany were designed to study the impact of metazooplankton on components of the microbial food web (bacteria, flagellates, ciliates). Zooplankton was manipulated in 500-liter epilimnetic mesocosms so that either Daphnia or copepods were dominating, or metazooplankton was virtually absent. The bacterial community responded immediately to changes in zooplankton composition. Biomass, productivity, and especially the morphology of the bacteria changed drastically in the different treatments. Cascading predation effects on the bacterioplankton were transmitted mainly by phagotrophic protozoans which had changed in species composition and biomass. When Daphnia dominated, protozoans were largely suppressed and the original morphological structure of the bacteria (mainly small rods and cocci) remained throughout the experiment. Dominance of copepods or the absence of metazoan predators resulted in a mass appearance of bacterivorous protists (flagellates and ciliates). They promoted a fast decline of bacterial abundance and a shift to the predominance of morphologically inedible forms, mainly long filaments. After 3 days they formed 80-90% of the bacterial biomass. The results indicate that metazooplankton predation on phagotrophic protozoans is a key mechanism for the regulation of bacterioplankton density and community structure.