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Seasonal dynamics of crustacean zooplankton, heterotrophic nanoflagellates and bacteria in a shallow, eutrophic lake

MPG-Autoren
http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons56752

Jürgens,  Klaus
Department Ecophysiology, Max Planck Institute for Limnology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons56956

Stolpe,  Gisela
Department Ecophysiology, Max Planck Institute for Limnology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

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Zitation

Jürgens, K., & Stolpe, G. (1995). Seasonal dynamics of crustacean zooplankton, heterotrophic nanoflagellates and bacteria in a shallow, eutrophic lake. Freshwater Biology, 33(1), 27-38.


Zitierlink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-E32E-1
Zusammenfassung
1. The seasonal development of crustacean zooplankton, heterotrophic nanoflagellates (HNF) and bacteria was examined in Grosser Binnensee, a shallow, eutrophic lake in northern Germany. The grazing impact of Daphnia on bacteria and nanoflagellates was estimated from field data on population abundances and from clearance rates obtained in laboratory experiments. 2. The seasonal succession of zooplankton showed distinct peaks of Daphnia magna, cyclopopid copepods, Bosmina longirostris and Daphnia galeata and D. hyalina. The population dynamics of Daphnia had the strongest impact on all sestonic components. Daphnia maxima coincided with clearwater phases, and were negatively correlated with particulate organic carbon (POC), HNF and phytoplankton. Bacterial abundance was only slightly affected although daphnids were at times more important as bacterial consumers than HNF, as estimated from measured bacterial clearance rates. Other crustaceans (copepods, Bosmina) were probably of minor importance as grazers of bacteria and nanoplankton. 3. HNF abundance varied from 550 ml(-1) to more than 30000 ml(-1). HNF appeared to be suppressed by daphnids and reached highest densities when copepods dominated the metazooplankton. The variation in HNF abundance was not reflected in the concentration of heterotrophic bacteria, which fluctuated rather irregularly between 5 and 20 x 10(6) ml(-1). Long filamentous bacteria which were probably resistant to protozoan grazing, however, appeared parallel to the development of HNF. These bacterial cells, although small in number, could comprise more than 30% of the total bacterial biomass