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Predator-induced diel vertical migration in Daphnia: enrichment and preliminary chemical characterization of a kairomone exuded by fish

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http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons56660

Von Elert,  Eric
Department Ecophysiology, Max Planck Institute for Limnology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/persons/resource/persons56801

Loose,  Carsten J.
Department Ecophysiology, Max Planck Institute for Limnology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society;

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Citation

Von Elert, E., & Loose, C. J. (1996). Predator-induced diel vertical migration in Daphnia: enrichment and preliminary chemical characterization of a kairomone exuded by fish. Journal of Chemical Ecology, 22(5), 885-895.


Cite as: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-000F-E2C0-0
Abstract
Planktivorous fish release a cue of an unknown chemical nature into the water that induces diel vertical migration in Daphnia as predator avoidance response. We used a bioassay to obtain information about the chemical nature of the kairomone. We present a method to enrich the cue from holding water of fish by sorbent extraction. The kairomone exuded by Leucaspius delineatus can be characterized as a nonolefinic low-molecular-weight anion of intermediate lipophilicity. The presence of amino groups in the molecule can be excluded, whereas hydroxy groups are essential for activity. Separation by HPLC yielded only one active fraction. The kairomones released by Carassius carassius and Rutilus rutilus showed the same chemical characteristics, suggesting that the kairomones from different species of fish, sensed by Daphia, are very similar, if not identical